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Table-Top Home Breath Machines

Differences Between a Portable Breath Analyzer and a Table-Top Home Breath Machine

When an individual is pulled over for a suspected DWI, they are commonly given field sobriety tests as well as breath & blood tests to determine if they are in fact intoxicated and have a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) over the legal limit. If the breath analyzer registered the individual's BAC over .08 they will be arrested and charged with a DWI. These types of tests are not infallible, however, which is why I strongly urge you consult with a Houston DWI lawyer from my firm if you have been arrested for a DWI. Many judges, doctors and attorneys agree that there are various factors which can skew accurate results in such portable machines. For example, burping, vomiting, hiccupping, or even having blood in your mouth prior to the test being taken, can cause the breathalyzer to register a false positive.

This, in numerous cases, is where the table-top breath machines come in. Precincts will use table-top breathalyzers, which employ infrared spectrophotometrics, to more accurately read BAC levels once an individual has been brought in for processing after their arrest. Courts are most likely to admit readings from table-top breath machines, than they are portable breathalyzers. Neither device is completely without error though.

One other type of machine is the table-top home breath machine, which is the least accurate of all the breathalyzers and is commonly used to monitor an individual's BAC level if they are on probation or under court supervision, similar to how courts use SCRAM bracelets or Ignition Interlock Devices. In any case, regardless of what the apparent results of a breathalyzer test indicate, improper calibration, lack of standard testing procedures, or previous erroneous readings from a breath machine are all reasons my firm can use to help build your defense and aggressively fight the charges against you.

Contact the Samuelson Law Firm today!

For 15 years The Samuelson Law Firm has been representing clients in all types of DWI cases. My staff and I are intimately familiar with all aspects of DWI charges, arrests, tactics and cases. I know what questions to ask and how to build my clients an aggressive defense in order to protect their rights. I am dedicated to each and every case, and handle my cases as if I was in my client's shoes. My firm serves Houston and Harris County, and I am available 24/7 to answer questions and help clients with their case-related needs.

My firm's hard work and committed has been recognized not only through our successes, but we have been given an AV® rating by Martindale-Hubbell®. I am also frequently asked by local and regional media outlets including ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC, to provide legal commentary on DWI stories. I have been quoted in The Houston Chronicle, The Galveston Daily News and the Wall Street Journal as well.

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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.